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Fall 2017 backside of Kinky before a savage damp winter destroyed much of her flank. Check out the compression ridges and her ‘root tail’.

weird wood or nature gone wild

In November of 2017, while hiking within the trail network of our Woodville community atop the North Mtn, I spied a very weird rotting black spruce stump.  I shot a few rolls of digital frame and thought nothing more of those images. While still on Facebook at that time, (not since March 2018) I posted an image to my profile and also to the photography club; alas there was precious little, if any commentary that I recall. No problemo. Perhaps I didn’t sufficiently spice the click bait! hahaha

Approaching dusk in 2017 from the original roll of digital frames.

In the early spring of this 2018 year, while atop the saddle once more, there it was coming outta a deep winter snow slumber covering, but, looking the worse for wear.  I decided to effect a snatch and grab, before nature took over her normal MO of “from dust to dust, ashes . . . ”

Chopped outta the ground as salvage. In an earlier story, I’ve written that I realized late in life, that what I do as well as for other creative people working in different media, is a partnership with the lineage that precedes as well as the intuition that speaks . . . when we listen to the nudges & whispers. At this time I was preparing to go into the stillness for guidance.

I had no idea what to do with her. She is definitely feminine in spirit and form, at least to this scribbler.

Woodshop window silhouette.

Me, mySelf & I,  only later, decided to take some of the hemlock left over from the Pi sculpture of 2011 that had been slowly curing in the house attic, to build a raised tripod sculpture.

A pure blue sky day with Kinky mounted on the slab; the 1st stage is complete.

There was a small slab of hemlock remaining, so it was commandeered, then pressed into service as a mounting block.

Crotch closeup of compression wood (likely incredibly close-knit curly figure underneath). Crotch wood in exotic species like mahogany, where very large flitches can be had, is highly prized as a speciality wood for veneering.  Apologies ladies, that’s what it’s known as. Double beauty. 😉

To best appreciate what nature hath wrought in her twisted logic, (or mine) it was felt that this weird wood could be viewed better by being mounted at eye level on a tripod.

I mounted a laminated image of what she looked like from a year ago for perspective on her backside.  Perhaps there are those who can value the tattoo.  🤨 Notice the moss agate cabochon on a leg midway down, covering up a ‘naughty’ branch. 😛

It’s not just the double twist with her first one at 90° and the second at 45° plus notice also that it’s not straight at a 45° return, but, a compound one, yet back towards where the stump exited the ground. It’s always both in life, rarely if ever or, usually and.  The Tao rules.

Hemlock slab left over as an offcut from Pi. See story in Sculptures.

It’s also about the tail, which became a root, as well as the severely constrained compression wood in the two crotches.

Stable on her slender long, textured legs; just the way I dreamed her into being.

 

Kinky was doing her bump and grind routine to the tune of twist an’ shout. To my warped mind and heart, this is the epitome of sacred reverence for life. 🤭

NS red beech that succumbed to my Husqvarna chainsaw, to make way for the 10 M (20′) secondary power line for the new house construction, 2009. Nature gone wild!

As with the image directly above, these other images I have dropped into this chapter are a few selections of some of the weird wood I have snapped on my travels across Canada, but, mostly here where I now call home, in the Annapolis Valley of this Nova Scotia.

“Hemlock double take” posing for the camera. On site where I camped in my tiny 12′ RV in 2009-2010. ‘Land reform’ was happening at the time.

A ground squirrel masquerading as a tree root 🙂  Just keep looking and ye shall be greatly rewarded.

White birch straddling the layered limestone cliff in the Kentville ravine back of the Research Station in a perfect rendition of a peace symbol. The real illusion is if you cannot see.  😕 Open your 💓 first, your  👁️ 👁️’s will naturally follow. Let The Force infill and unfold you. Yes, ‘it’s everywhere, it’s everywhere’! hahaha

Spruce burl on the site of the present Cape Split parking lot, long since discarded.  Progress, or so ‘they’ say.

“The wind made me do it.” Atop Cape Split just before the final leg of the uphill slog for the panoramic view. Yet another dead black spruce, as with Kinky.

Giant cedar burl in Pemberton, BC residential driveway 2007.

“Blowin’ in the wind” from a public bldg in Kentville, blown down in the Dec 13th 2010 storm. Likely a black spruce.

This maple sports a horizontal branch that is 5 metres long! It’s known to hikers as the Fatsy Tree. I believe that when Etienne wrote about this on Facebook in mid 2015, I noticed how new the carving of that word was in the bark. Ahhh, hey Steve . . . ? hahaha  The last time I hiked the Split, the tree was in severe distress and leaning very close to terra firma.

 

“wired branch” Yup, no photoshopping here. I was clearing the 12 M (40′) NS Power right of way for my service in 2009. The two young poplars reached out to each other, joining hands in a platonic love affair. Don’t ya just love it when nature shows its real conscious awareness? Nope #1, these are not inanimate objects. Nope #2, you cannot make this sort of stuff up.  For that, you must absolutely be the sacred natural world. Open your 👁️ 👁️’s, as she’s all ’round.

I am John Gabriel Otvos, aka jayöh.